Nightingales (Fine, Vivian)

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Scores

 Complete score
#202708 - 0.92MB, 9 pp. -  0.0/10 2 4 6 8 10 (0) - !N/!N/!N - 205x

PDF typeset by Paul Hawkins
rhymesandchymes (2012/4/11)

 Complete parts
#202709 - 1.04MB, 12 pp. -  10.0/10 2 4 6 8 10 (1) - !N/!N/!N - 111x

PDF typeset by Paul Hawkins
rhymesandchymes (2012/4/11)

PMLP343320-Nightingales Motet Score.pdf
Publisher Info.:

Vivian Fine Estate

Copyright:

Performance Restricted Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives 1.0 [tag/del]

© COPYRIGHT NOTICE. THIS FILE IS PROTECTED UNDER COPYRIGHT LAW.
However, the lawful copyright owner has generously released the file for distribution at IMSLP under one of the Creative Commons licenses or the IMSLP Performance Restricted License, which allow for the free distribution (with proper attribution) of the file with various levels of restriction with respect to the creation of derivative works, commercial usage, or public performances.

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General Information

Work Title Nightingales-Motet for Six Instruments
Alternative Title
Composer Fine, Vivian
Movements/Sections One movement
Year/Date of Composition 1979
First Performance 1979-08-21, Bennnington College, Bennington, Vermont
Chamber Music Conference and Composer’s Forum of the East. Robert Ackerberg, flute; Sylvia Ackerberg, oboe; Nancy Dunetz, violin; Marc Basturschek and Bernard Schlanger, violas; Marji Danilow, bass.
Average Duration 6 minutes
Piece Style Modern
Instrumentation Flute, oboe, violin, 2 violas, double bass


Misc. Comments

Nightingales was another commission by the Chamber Music Conference and Composers Forum of the East. Fine continued the theme of expansion by using a vocal form for an instrumental ensemble of flute, oboe, violin, two violas, and a double bass. The score, which has no relationship to her earlier Sounds of the Nightingale (1971), is inscribed with the following: “What bird so sings yet so does wail? / O tis the ravish’d nightingale” by John Lyly, a poet whose work she had used about forty years prior in Four Elizabethan Songs. Instead of words, this motet has five nightingale-like melodies, with the flute presenting melody one, the oboe having melody two three beats later, the violin sounding melody three during a repetition of the oboe’s melody, the viola beginning melody four at the end of the violin’s melody three, and the double bass introducing melody five later. The ensemble is instructed to “Sing like a nightingale,” and each melody is so distinctive that it could represent a line of poetry.

—Heidi Von Gunden, The Music of Vivian Fine, Scarecrow Press, 1999
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