Codex buranus (Anonymous)

Contents

Performances

Naxos Search

Search key: anonymous codex buranus

Javascript not enabled.

Sheet Music

Other

PDF scanned by Rodney Reynolds
Philip Legge (2008/12/21)

PDF scanned by Rodney Reynolds
Philip Legge (2008/12/21)

PDF scanned by Rodney Reynolds
Philip Legge (2008/12/21)

PDF scanned by Rodney Reynolds
Philip Legge (2008/12/21)

PDF scanned by Rodney Reynolds
Philip Legge (2008/12/21)

PDF scanned by Rodney Reynolds
Philip Legge (2008/12/21)

PDF scanned by Rodney Reynolds
Philip Legge (2008/12/21)

Copyist Anonymous
Publisher. Info. Manuscript Clm 4660
Reprinted Munich: Prestel-Verlag, 1967 (with the Institute of Mediaeval Music, Brooklyn, N.Y.)
Copyright
Misc. Notes The manuscript Clm 4660 consists of 112 folios, along with Clm 4660a, a set of 7 individual leaves that were subsequently identified as once belonging to the codex. The numeration of folios above follows the current ordering of the codex. The original ordering of gatherings in the codex was altered sometime during the mediæval period, and some sections of the codex have been lost. The original ordering of the 112 folios appears to have been: 43–48; 1–42; 49–56; 73–82; 57–72; 83–112 (with other gaps assumed).
Purchase
Javascript is required for this feature.
TN-Fortuna imperatrix mundi.jpg
Javascript is required to submit files.

General Information

Work Title Codex buranus
Alternative. Title Carmina burana
Composer Anonymous
Movements/SectionsMov'ts/Sec's over 200 texts
Year/Date of CompositionY/D of Comp. before 1250
First Publication. 1847, 1901 (fragments)
Librettist Anonymous
Language Latin, High German
Piece Style Medieval


Misc. Comments

Illuminated mediæval codex of over 200 Latin texts, authors usually anonymous, many with neumatic musical notation, authored in southern Germany and preserved until 1800 at Benediktbeuern in Bavaria.

The manuscript is of particular interest since Carl Orff used a number of texts from the codex in his cantata “Carmina Burana”: the song categorised as CB17 on folio 1r (p.1) is used as the opening and closing item in his cycle, “Fortuna imperatrix mundi” (Fortune, Empress of the World).

Other texts used by Orff appear on folios 28v, 32r, 37r, 48v, 50r, 53v, 56v–57r, 59r–60v, 67v, 69v–72r, 84r, 87v, 97v, and 107v.

Besides the illustration of the wheel of fortune (which was moved from a later position in the codex to become a frontispiece) there are several ornate illuminations or other drawings throughout the codex, for example at 39r, 64v, 72v, 77v, and several from 89v to 92r.