3 Pieces for Violin and Piano (Fine, Vivian)

Contents

Performances

Recordings

MP3 file (audio)
rhymesandchymes (2012/2/16)

MP3 file (audio)
rhymesandchymes (2013/1/15)

MP3 file (audio)
rhymesandchymes (2013/1/15)

Performers Frances Breed, violin and VIvian Fine, piano
Publisher Info. Vivian Fine Estate
Copyright
Misc. Notes Audio quality not great but only extant recording. Composer on the piano.
Purchase
Javascript is required for this feature.

Naxos Search

Search key: fine pieces for violin and piano

Javascript not enabled.

Sheet Music

Scores and Parts

PDF scanned by Paul Hawkins
rhymes&chymes (2012/2/16)

PDF scanned by Paul Hawkins
rhymes&chymes (2012/2/16)

Publisher. Info. Vivian Fine Estate
Copyright
Misc. Notes Request Licenses from ASCAP
Report performances to Vivian Fine Estate
Purchase
Javascript is required for this feature.
PMLP314327-Three Pieces for Violin and Piano score.pdf
Javascript is required to submit files.

General Information

Work Title Three Pieces for Violin and Piano
Alternative. Title
Composer Fine, Vivian
Movements/SectionsMov'ts/Sec's 3 movements
Moderato
Andante
Vivace
Year/Date of CompositionY/D of Comp. 1940
First Performance. 1946-04-16 in New York City. International Society for Contemporary Music Forum Group
Orrea Pernel, violin and Beveridge Webster, piano
Average DurationAvg. Duration 9 minutes
Composer Time PeriodComp. Period Modern
Piece Style Modern
Instrumentation violin and piano
External Links Vivian Fine website


Misc. Comments

Patterned with figures that create a motor rhythm, each piece generates an energy that is shared equally by the violin and piano. Fine has an innate sense for how to direct this energy, for each piece seems to be just the right amount of time. Never does she overwrite or repeat material unnecessarily. The first piece is through-composed in the style of a baroque prelude. It begins tonally, but by measure 2 the piano adds Fine’s distinctive dotted rhythmic gestures and dissonant vertical structures. The second piece is slower and melodic, often being three-voice counterpoint due to melodies woven into the piano figuration. The last piece is a humorous gigue that at one point has the marking “misterioso” and “with exaggerated expression and rubato.”

—Heidi Von Gunden, The Music of Vivian Fine, Scarecrow Press, 1999